JSON   RDF   ISO19115/ISO19139 XML

Namoi connectivity and dominant flux

Abstract

This dataset was supplied to the Bioregional Assessment Programme by a third party and is presented here as originally supplied. The metadata was not provided by the data supplier and has been compiled by the programme based on known details.

The interconnections between groundwater and river systems remain poorly understood in many catchments throughout the world, and yet they are fundamental to effectively managing water resources. Groundwater extraction from aquifers that are connected to river systems will reduce river flows, and this has implications for riverine ecosystem health, water security, aesthetic and cultural values, as well as water allocation and water management policies more generally. The decline in river flows as a consequence of groundwater extractions has the potential to threaten river basin industries and communities reliant on water resources. In this thesis, (Ivkovic, Karen Marie-Jeanne (2006). Modelling groundwater-river interactions for assessing water allocation options, PhD Thesis, Australian National University. https://digitalcollections.anu.edu.au/handle/1885/49342. Doctor of Philosophy Thesis, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia), the connectivity between groundwater and river systems and the impact that groundwater extractions have on river flows were studied in one of Australia's most developed irrigation areas, the Namoi River catchment in New South Wales. Gauged river reaches in the Namoi River catchment were characterised according to three levels of information, using the available data up to 2003: 1) presence of hydraulic connection between aquifer-river systems; 2) dominant direction of aquifer-river flux; and 3) the potential for groundwater extraction to impact on river flows. The methods used to characterise the river reaches included the following analyses: 1) a comparison of groundwater and river channel base elevations using a GIS/Database; 2) stream hydrographs and the application of a baseflow separation filter; 3) flow duration curves and the percentage of time a river flows; 4) vertical aquifer connectivity from nested piezometer sites; and 5) paired stream and groundwater hydrographs.

Dataset History

Gauged river reaches in the Namoi River catchment were characterised according to three levels of information, using the data record up to 2003: 1) presence of hydraulic connection between aquifer-river systems; 2) dominant direction of aquifer-river flux; and 3) the potential for groundwater extraction to impact on river flows. The methods used to characterise the river reaches included the following analyses: 1) a comparison of groundwater and river channel base elevations using a GIS/Database; 2) stream hydrographs and the application of a baseflow separation filter; 3) flow duration curves and the percentage of time a river flows; 4) vertical aquifer connectivity from nested piezometer sites; and 5) paired stream and groundwater hydrographs.

Dataset Citation

Bioregional Assessment Programme (2006) Namoi connectivity and dominant flux. Bioregional Assessment Source Dataset. Viewed 10 December 2018, http://data.bioregionalassessments.gov.au/dataset/64f74a84-1808-43a7-9710-e5580f76473b.

Data and Resources

This dataset has no data

Additional Info

Field Value
Title Namoi connectivity and dominant flux
Type Dataset
Language eng
Licence Limited access. Requests to the Bioregional Assesment Programme http://www.bioregionalassessments.gov.au/data
Data Status historicalArchive
Update Frequency notPlanned
Landing Page https://data.gov.au/data/dataset/bd3429c2-280b-43bb-98ba-0515b824c73d
Date Published 2018-12-10
Date Updated 2019-11-13
Contact Point
Bioregional Assessment Program
bioregionalassessments@environment.gov.au
Temporal Coverage N/A - N/A
Geospatial Coverage POLYGON ((0 0, 0 0, 0 0, 0 0))
Jurisdiction NONE
Data Portal data.gov.au
Publisher/Agency Bioregional Assessment Program